Philips is teaming up with NeuroNexus Technologies, out of Ann Arbor, Michigan, to develop smaller, more responsive, and MRI friendly deep brain stimulation devices. NeuroNexus has an expertise in silicon and polymer based micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) designed specifically for brain interface. 

Discover The World's MOST COMPREHENSIVE Mental Health Assessment Platform

Efficiently assess your patients for 80+ possible conditions with a single dynamic, intuitive mental health assessment. As low as $12 per patient per year.

According to the company’s website, they have developed the technology that enables “placement of sophisticated microelectronic and fluidic components on the surface of miniaturized brain probes that can be used to ‘map’ brain function, to record or transmit information, to stimulate or modulate functions in specific regions where the brain’s natural abilities to do so are compromised, or even to deliver drugs to precisely where they are needed.”

Here’s what Philips expects from this collaboration:

By combining Philips Research’s strengths in microelectronics, signal processing, ultra-low power system design and miniaturization with NeuroNexus Technologies’ expertise in micro-scale electrode design and fabrication, the two companies aim to show the technical feasibility of highly programmable and MRI-safe deep brain stimulation devices. Their initial research will aim to meet the functional requirements of a deep brain stimulation device for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. This is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that impairs people’s motor skills and speech, leading to a progressive loss in quality of life. Recent publications suggest that deep brain stimulation could also be suitable for treating psychiatric disorders such as clinical depression.

Late-stage Parkinson’s disease is increasingly being treated using deep brain stimulation – a technique that involves implantation of a medical device, a “brain pacemaker” that sends electrical impulses to specific parts of the patient’s brain via permanently inserted electrodes. The pacemaker control unit is normally implanted into the patient’s chest or abdomen, with a connecting lead routed under the skin to the brain electrode. While offering an effective therapy that helps many patients, currently available technologies have significant limitations.

“As currently used, deep brain stimulation poses several challenges to both the patient and the physician: The implantation requires a lengthy surgical procedure involving both neurosurgeons and neurologists. Following surgery, setting the right stimulation parameters requires painstaking efforts on the part of the neurologists before the patient can be sent home. In the long term, patients may for example develop spine problems that would require further examination using MRI, but with current implants MRI scans are not possible due to the materials used in the fabrication of DBS electrodes and the stimulators”, explains Prof. Maximilian Mehdorn, Head of Neurosurgery at the Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.

The joint research project aims to address these clinical needs, and will leverage Philips’ expertise in medical imaging and surgery planning with the aim of simplifying the implantation process and shortening the surgical procedure. Philips will also contribute to making the entire device MRI compatible so that patients fitted with the implant are not barred from MRI scans. With its world-leading track record in neural micro-electrodes, NeuroNexus Technologies brings in key technology and knowledge for novel brain probes.

Hot daily news right into your inbox.